Feeder Mice

Index

 

 

The mice known as feeder mice are said to have originated in Asia. The mice then migrated to Europe. At the time of the discovery of the new world, these mice were getting onto the boats in Europe and travelling to America where they started a population on American soil. These mice are found almost all over the globe. The reason they reach so far around the world is that every four hundred and twenty five days there population grows to one million. The high amounts of these mice resulted in an over population of mice or in scientific terms-plague proportions.

Feeder mice can devour up to 100 grams of food a day or as little as 15 grams a day. A female feeder mouse will give birth to a litter size from 8 to 14 mice. Their heart beats approximately at six hundred beats per minute with a respiration rate at approximately one hundred and fifteen per minute.
As soon as a feeder mouse has been born, it is born hairless, sightless, and dependent on the mother's nurturing and protection. While at this point in life they are referred to as "pinkies". Following this, they begin to develop sight and hair but are still very much dependent on their mother's nurturing and protection. At this point of development they are referred to as "fuzzies". After this stage they are fully developed and are referred to as "feeders" having erect ears, opened and functioning eyes, good muscle coordination and fur. At this time the mice are weaned onto solid foods and are able to function on their own.

If you are looking at facts about breeding mice you need to find the most healthiest mice as possible. Healthy mice should have sleek bodies and thick tails. A thick tail means they eat very well. You also need to look for mice that have clear eyes and smooth skin. If they have bumpy skin they may have a tumour or several tumours. You should bring together 1 male with 5 female mice. If a mouse is running in circles, scratching it-self excessively, or has lumps in its skin, you should replace it with a healthy one. Another import step is to keep their environment clean. You should change the bedding once every week and make sure there is plenty of food and fresh water. Itís a good idea to use bedding that absorbs moisture and keep the habitat out of direct sunlight.
Feeder mice are widely used in laboratories. The laboratories will normally breed their own mice so there are less likely to be defects or diseases in them. These mice are used for testing the likes of: hearing tests, antibody testing, cancer, etc.
They make very interesting little pets for kids. They are also great for feeding to other animals and for laboratory purposes.

A mouse can be annoying where mice can be a bigger problem! Getting rid of mice can be done in many ways such as the use of traps that kill or catch and poisons. Controlling mice in and around your home must be taken seriously as they can introduce illnesses to your family as well as transfer fleas to pets.

  • Mice will normally sleep for over 12 hours a day.
  • Mice eat, or at least chew anything that is softer than their teeth.
  • Mice are very neat as they will sleep, eat and excrete in different places.
  • Mice do not like rats as rats are known to prey on mice however in the wild they do live together.
  • Mice can jump straight up to about 18 inches and are also very good climbers and swimmers.
  • A male mouse is called a buck.
  • A female mouse is called a doe.
  • The offspring of mice are called pups or kitten.
  • A group of mice are called a family, horde or a nest.
  • A wild mouse will live no longer than 1 year.
  • A pet mouse may live for between 2 and 3 years.
  • A mouseís tail is almost as long as its body.
  • Mice do not see in colour.
  • Mice are nocturnal creatures.
  • Mice can and will chew through anything softer than their teeth.
  • Mice cause more than 1 billion dollarsí worth of damage in the US alone each year.

Mouse - Pest - Feeder - Trap - Rats - Kill - Mouse Control - Feeder - Poison - Pest - Poison for Mouse - Kill - Feeder - Trap - Pest - Eat - Trap - Rid - Feeder - House - Kill - Pest - Field - Trap - Feeder - Mouse - Pictures - Pest - Kill - Dead - Feeder - Trap - Mouse Traps - Catch - Pest - Feeder - Kill - Baby Mouse - Knockout - Trap - Feeder - Age - Kill - Pest - Repellent - Live - Feeder - Pet - Droppings - Trap - Cage - Kill - Feeder - White - Feces - Trap - Pest - Mouse - Feeder - Rats - Kill - Trap - Mouse Control - Feeder - Pest - Poison - Trap - Kill - Feeder - Poison for Mouse - Eat - Trap - Feeder - Pest - Kill - Rid - House - Field - Pest - Mouse - Feeder - Trap - Pictures - Kill - Dead - Mouse Traps - Pest - Catch - Trap - Baby - Kill - Mouse - Knockout - Trap - Pest - Age - Kill - Repellent - Live - Pet - Pest - Trap - Kill - Droppings - Cage - White - Feces - Trap - Kill - Pest - Feeder - Mouse - Pest - Feeder - Trap - Rats - Kill - Mouse Control - Feeder - Poison - Pest - Poison for Mouse - Kill - Feeder - Trap - Pest - Eat - Trap - Rid - Feeder - House - Kill - Pest - Field - Trap - Feeder - Mouse - Pictures - Pest - Kill - Dead - Feeder - Trap - Mouse Traps - Catch - Pest - Feeder - Kill - Baby Mouse - Knockout - Trap - Feeder - Age - Kill - Pest - Repellent - Live - Feeder - Pet - Droppings - Trap - Cage - Kill - Feeder - White - Feces - Trap - Pest - Mouse - Feeder - Rats - Kill - Trap - Mouse Control - Feeder - Pest - Poison - Trap - Kill - Feeder - Poison for Mouse - Eat - Trap - Feeder - Pest - Kill - Rid - House - Field - Pest - Mouse - Feeder - Trap - Pictures - Kill - Dead - Mouse Traps - Pest - Catch - Trap - Baby - Kill - Mouse - Knockout - Trap - Pest - Age - Kill - Repellent - Live - Pet - Pest - Trap - Kill - Droppings - Cage - White - Feces - Trap - Kill - Pest - Feeder -
© 2015
Cookie Policy By James Jones Privacy Statement